BirchWeaving1

The fun begins when you stop treating weaving as strictly back and forth and start looking at it as a grid that can be worked in any direction. Twisting, knotting, wrapping – if you can think it, try it!

I made a wall hanging a while back that I wasn’t totally happy with (blogged here), which I pulled out to make this. I’m really pleased with how this one turned out, it’s much tighter so you don’t see the warp threads and I like the richness of it. I am so so lucky to have been passed on such beautiful materials from a former weaver and dear family friend. I honestly wouldn’t know where to begin sourcing this kind of stuff.

BirchWeaving3

One thing I love about wool is how well it works with other materials. Wool and fabric, wool and leather, wool and wood. I wanted to somehow hang this weaving through a piece of wood (I was thinking walnut), and it was my step-dad who recommend I try something more raw and sawed off this piece of birch branch… Yes! The bark has an almost metallic quality that compliments the wool without overpowering it.

BirchWeaving2

As you can see the bulk of the weaving was done with wool rovings. I love the texture of the knots and twists. I actually think it’s texture, thickness and size would make it an neat front door decoration. Instead of a wreath, why not a weaving?

BirchWeaving4

I was having trouble finishing the edges of this, and came up with this little wrap technique that stabilized the top and bottom to help it hang flat. Furthermore, I fed a steel rod through the top and bottom to keep it from buckling (again, thank you step-dad for your wisdom and steel cutting abilities!).

So. Lesson learned here is don’t let the idea of how something should be done stop you from doing what you want to do. That’s actually a lesson I’ve been learning across the board recently.

Woven Wall Hanging with Birch Branch
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